Dress codes at Vegas Strip Clubs

 

This is the story of Barry Belvedere. Barry wants to go to a nightclub, but he’s not sure what he should wear. He read the dress codes on the club’s website, but he’s also been to clubs before and seen people breaking them. Barry is very confused, and we’re betting he’s not alone.

Dress codes at Vegas Strip Clubs – Spearmint Rhino, Crazy Horse 3 & Sapphire

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Trying to decide what to wear to the club can be tedious and overwhelming, not only because you want to look as good as possible so the 12 people who can see past the darkness, lasers, smoke and their own drunkenness will like you. You always want to be sure you get in.

Regardless of body type, what you wear to the club matters. And there’s nothing worse than getting to the front of the line and being told you don’t meet the dress code, except, you know, all the things that are objectively worse than that. But we’re here to talk about the dress code thing. So let’s get down to it and see what we can do to help Barry, and all the Barry Belvederes of the world, get into the club and get their smooth on.

Seen here: Barry Belvedere smiling at the camera, not realizing the blonde is into him. Poor Barry.

Seen here: Barry Belvedere smiling at the camera, not realizing the blonde is into him. Poor Barry.

Dress codes at Vegas Strip Clubs – Spearmint Rhino, Crazy Horse 3 & Sapphire

What they say

The clubs all have their rules on their websites. We even like to list the obligatory “Establishment reserves the right to refuse entry to anyone not meeting dress code requirements.” It’s pretty important that they lay down the restrictions so your dad doesn’t show up in his khaki shorts and sandals+socks combo.

When Barry looked at the club’s site he saw clichés like “upscale nightclub attire” and the only slightly more specific “gentlemen must wear collared shirts and dress shoes.” The codes leave even more wiggle room than the dance floors. They also tend to specify no baseball hats or tennis shoes or ripped clothing or baggy clothing or lions or tigers or bears or saying “Oh my” unless you’re George Takei. That’s a lot of stuff you can’t do. But damn clubs, tell us how you really feel.

"Oh I'm just standing in my closet trying to decide what to wear tonight and smiling like a freaking psycho."

“Oh I’m just standing in my closet trying to decide what to wear tonight and smiling like a freaking psycho.”

What they mean

This is the point where Barry went to his closet, stared at his wardrobe, looked at the tux he wore to his brother’s wedding, the suit he wore to his Bar Mitzvah and the cocktail dress he wore in college. But which should he pick? Which will get him through the door and which will get him some action? That is the question that’s worth only slightly more than the table fee.

The clubs put dress codes in because they want to keep everything as upscale as they can. To quote Omnia, “This journey is an occasion, so please dress for it.” That makes sense. Most people don’t make clubbing a nightly outing. It’s something special to do on vacation or when your BFF just got dumped and needs some rebound booty before the breakup box shows up. But what the clubs really mean is that they don’t want people to treat this place like it’s a bar. A nightclub isn’t a bar. It isn’t a place you decide to go when you want a drink. It’s a place you plan in advance and consider an adventure. You should look nice not because the people at the door are requiring it, but because you want to feel, in your own skin, like 007 has nothing on you. That’s how Barry felt when he looked in the mirror.